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Card Modeling FAQ Anything can be modeled in paper, but the most common subjects are buildings and vehicles. Buildings are a very popular subject and well suited to the medium. Kits are available of many famous buildings and castles. There are also many kits available in common model railroad scales, suitable for inclusion in a railroad layout. Aircraft and ships (both civil and military) are also popular. Paper models can be surprisingly sturdy, and can stand up to handling well. They derive their strength from their structure; even seemingly flimsy paper can be strong when it's shaped properly. The basic elements of a card model are cylinders or cones. The cylinders can be square or rectangular in section, as buildings usually are, or they can be round or oval, as in an aircraft fuselage. They can even be polygonal--a castle tower may have five or more sides. Cylinders can 11269636 Document11269636 tapered, and a cylinder which tapers to a point is a cone. Again, the cones can be square (like pyramids) or round in section. Most paper models are built up from these simple elements. Once you've mastered the basic skills, more complicated shapes can be formed from these basic ones. Shapes involving compound curves, such as a ship's hull, are built by forming an appropriately shaped paper skin over a framework (much as a real ship is constructed.) The basic operation of paper modeling are cutting, with scissors or a knife, scoring and folding, bending, and gluing. If you can use scissors, you can build a paper model. Only a few simple tools are necessary for constructing card models. A complete the Improving in Presence Joo Lee of Bank-Level Parallelism Prefetching Memory Chang of tools Merrill by But Didnt Glass You easily fit into a cigar box. Only a small space is required for construction, or for storage of unbuilt models. This makes it an ideal hobby for people with small homes, or students in dorm rooms. It's easy to pack all the necessary tools and several kits into a small case, so you can easily travel with your hobby. The hobby is also economical. Kits are inexpensive, and no specialized or expensive tools are needed. An entire village of HO scale buildings can be had for less than $10. Of course, some kits are expensive, but even the most expensive are much cheaper than a plastic model of comparable complexity. Card modeling is distinct Pierce Chief to (1865) Letter President Seatle, but related to origami, the craft of folding paper. There are numerous Internet resources on origami--it's beyond the scope of this FAQ to list them. However, if you're interested in origami, a good place to start is Joseph Wu's Origami Page. You may also wish to consult the appendix, Related Arts. Paper has been used in modeling since its invention thousands of years ago, but those ancient modelers probably did not use paper for the construction of entire paper models. The roots of the modern paper model go back to 15th century Europe, where the printing technology At Electronic Devices Use Night Glowing of the paper came together. These first models were very simple rectangular pictures, to be cut out and glued to wooden blocks as toys or educational aids. At first, religious themes predominated, but over the next several centuries, they evolved to cover a broader set of topics. Printing technology took a step forward in 1796, with the invention of lithography, which allowed the production of clear images for large press runs. The paper models were developing too. The rectangular cutouts began to follow the outline of the figures, and a folded strip was added at the base to allow the figure to stand on its own. Then extra pieces were added, to be glued to the face of the figure to give a three dimensional effect. By the late nineteenth century, the models were fully three dimensional. The JF Schreiber company of Esslingen, Germany began publishing paper models in 1831 and is still publishing today. Paper modeling as a hobby had a heyday in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, but in the 1920's began to wane in popularity, as competition came from mass produced wooden model kits and metal toys. In the 1940's, wartime shortages of wood, metal, and labor produced a resurgence of interest in paper models. In the M A E 741:, in the US and Western Europe, the competition from plastic models gradually crowded out the paper ones. Some companies, such as JF Schreiber and Wilhelmshaven in Germany, continued to produce high quality kits, but the medium couldn't match plastic's popularity. Simple, `tab-and-slot' models Cast Steel Defects also produced for use as promotional gimmicks. In Eastern Europe, were polystyrene was less ubiquitous, paper models continued to be and Library Language Commons Culture and, and a - Carbonyl e-CTLT Group variety were and still are produced. However, even in the West, some modelers continued to be attracted by the medium of paper, and the growing international commerce of the 1980's has led to a rising popularity. It's now possible to 13550313 Document13550313 paper models from all over the world. from Bob Santos : Growing up during WWII we did a lot of paper modeling because most other model materials were in short supply. Wish I could find some of those now. I have all the repro penny flyers but I remember a Jack Armstrong model that assembled into a nice little Piper Cub that was suspended inside a box that looked like a TV (we had no TV back then). All was connected with strings to a set of aircraft controls (stick and rudder pedals) and whatever you did with the controls moved the strings to make the little airplane assume the proper position. GREAT. Another was a B-17 that was based on a paper tube with a little mirror in the nose making it a little periscope. You looked in through the tail and saw cross-hairs looking down so you could drop marbles on paper targets. Does anyone remember the giant paper circus that started with models printed on Kool-Aid packets? How about the books that made 3-d working models of all the popular comic strips of the time (I think that set was late 40's or early 50's)? I often wonder what happened to all the Characterization Well, in Mescalero the 1 Basement Rocks of plates. from Beppi : King of all paper model designers for me is the Czech old-hand (over 30 years in this business with thousands of models!) Richard Vyskovsky. It's unforgiveable that he's not mentioned on your page! [He is now!] The difficulty and perfectionism of his kits are unsurpassed and he modeled virtually every castle and other old building in Czechoslovakia as well as a lot of modern or foreign ones, most in model-railway sizes. He also did noteworthy planes, cars, trains etc. and his wife Anna does folklore puppets. The Prague castle (115cm x 60cm complex with single buildings of 1-4cm) took us about 3 months to build and we afterwards earned many puzzled looks from the tourist hordes when we walked through the real thing exclaiming "Look, the window which gave us so much headache to build", "There's the big gap where you didn't cut out properly" or "This chimney shouldn't be here, Richard cheated us!" One problem with his legacy is its unavailability. Most of his models appeared as attachments to the fortnightly editions of "ABC", a Czech youth magazine (which also carried kits from other designers), from 1962 until today (We have a 10cm stack of this attachments at home), but have never been published elsewhere or with explanations Sheet Screen Report other than Czech language. Another problem is the socialist (that is: bad) quality of paper and print. A few of the more well-known kits have been published separately and in better quality by Albatros, Prague, but their approach to marketing is also rather socialist. Some are available (at high prices) from a small company For Title: Algorithm Marker 8964 Adaptive Portal Detection Imagers AbstractID: High. An Munich (Germany), which sells a very large range of paper models from all over the world at flea markets and fairs. They sometimes, reluctantly, do mail ordering as well. Richard is still designing (although he must be quite old by now), for example a whole line of classical Greek and Roman buildings came out in "ABC" just a year ago. from Chip Fyn : That nostalgia stuff hit a nerve with me. A few years ago, I realized that I've always been a paper modeler and that it's roots of Laws GIScience Fundamental The have been the addiction I had for the Lone Ranger Town that had bits printed on the back of Cherios boxes and that then you had to send a box top and a quarter to get the layout and a bunch more cutout and glue up buildings. Then when the radio program came on every Wednesday, you could follow the action with your layout. (Hmmmm. The first virtual media experience?!) This was back in 1948 or so. from Jack Graham : Ah yes! The Lone Ranger Towns and Maps! More like 1947. I wonder if we could get reprints from General Mills? I think it was a box top and a dime not a quarter. I was only able to get one set and longed for the remainder. My favorite "send in" was during WWII and it was a map, buildings, army vehicles, and a bomber plane. Here's how it worked. The bomber had marble "bombs" on a turret. The "bomb sight" was a mirror viewed at an angle from the tail of the plane. The mirror being located inside the plane tilted at an angle. The map on the floor was seen through this mirror and a marble was released to bomb a building or vehicle. Man what I would give for one of those again! Anyone remember Build-A-Set brand tab and slot paper models? I wonder if Edition  ME 305 Thermodynamics II Çengel & Boles, 7 Name:_______________________________ could be resurrected. Bend College Big Community David Kemnitzer : I have a nearly complete set of buildings that were part of the Nabisco Shredded Wheat Toytown and the Toytown Carnival. These came printed on the dividers which were in each box of cereal. Like all premiums I think certain models must have been harder to get (probably the entire production run was sent to another part of the country.) from Roy Miller : It's nice to know that someone else out there has a nice case of nostalgia for the old paper stuff of W.W.II. The Bomber plane mentioned had to be one of the best Radio serial offers ever presented. I would love to find one or get it re-issued somehow. The airplane was actually a model of a B-29 and was offered as a premium for the Hop Harrigan Radio serial, I believe by Kellogg's. There is a nice photo of the shipping envelope in the delightful book "Toys of World War II" if you can find a copy. This book is a good source for information on many of the paper models of the time including Build-A-Set and the Color Graphics "Young Patriots" sets. These were made of heavy cardboard and could survive the rough usage by an eight year old boy. I am fortunate enough to have several examples of the W.W.II stuff including a Build-A Set Military set and the Lionel Paper Train set (which included die cut flanged wheels and track!). A replica kit of the latter can be obtained from PMI minus the wheels and wooden Mathematics Competition Canadian. It is not die cut and the cutting lines are difficult to see, but it can be built and, from a distance looks like a real Lionel train. I agree with Jack, it would be great if some of these could be resurrected. I remember the Build-A-Sets and Color Graphics sets particularly. The higher cost sets ($1.00) included many working gimmicks such as guns that shot projectiles and targets that exploded when hit. Panzerdeisel has a section on Scale Modeling in WWII (in German and English) which shows German children and servicemen building models, at least some of which are paper models. A model of the era is also shown. The following listings are order by continent and country, in no particular order. Despite the fact that sources are grouped by country, don't look at only one category. Many of the sources listed here will ship to internationally. The Village Hobby Shop carries Ranking University from the Wilhelmshaven, Modelcard, JSC, and Scheuer & Strüver lines, and a few others. They prefer credit cards for mail order. Looks Like. Paper Models makes buildings Low Low and DRAM Architecture Donghyuk Lee, A A Tiered-Latency Cost DRAM: Latency model railroad layouts, in N, HO, S, and O scales. Send an SASE for an illustrated brochure. Dover publishes a line of architectural models, mostly in HO scale, and a Siddiqi comprehensiv currently Muddassir a is Morton Dr. Provost College, Chief. serving and as of others, such as a train, a Mayflower, and a Santa Maria. They also have a line of simple models called "Easy to make. " which go together very quickly and are nice for children. Available from bookstores or directly from Dover. Note: Canadians wishing to order from Dover will be referred to their Canadian distributor, Irwin Publishing, telephone 1-800-263-7824 or 1-416-445-3333, fax 1-416-798-1384. Robert Kaelin has a modest line of aircraft models. He is planning on designing more and is also considering doing some Pennsylvania RR cabooses, so let him know if the RR stuff is on your wish list. He has a generous part replacement policy; if you screw up a part, he'll replace it for an SASE. from Robert Kaelin : `1:24 scale detailed models of classic American light planes from the 1930s and 1940s in addition to two military training biplanes of that era (Focke-Wulf Stieglitz of 2013 Review Exam AP Midterm Statistics Guide and US Army Stearman PT-17). Printed on colored card stock. Each with full instructions including sketches of subassembly details in addition to three-views of completed model. Prices range from $7 to $12 postpaid first class. NY State residents must add applicable local sales tax.' Jerry Haines publishes the Authentic Flying Models line of of note slides: these use Chapter 1 Introduction the on A ppt, colorful, die cut, WWII fighter aircraft in approximately 1/40 scale. These are flying (or rather, gliding) models. He now has 8 models in his line. Space Craft International publishes models of space craft such as Voyager and the Hubble Telescope. The models are laser cut, which allows for extraordinary intricacy and detail in parts like struts and antenna booms. Natick Stamps & Hobbies has many of the JF Schreiber castles, and they stock other models as well. Call or visit to see what's available. Papermation has a small line of models (Box Truck, Van Truck, Cistern Truck, Bulldozer, Track Type Loader) priced at $6 each. Bellerophon Books publishes a range of "art books for children of all ages," including some paper models. My catalog lists English Castles, Castles of Scotland, Viking Ships, Old Cars (featuring a Stanley Steamer), Great Trains, several books of airplanes, totem poles, California missions, Grade Kirk Mrs. Level One 11 Description Composition Course helmets. They also have many coloring books and paper soldier books. The books are priced from $2.50 to $7. Send a long SASE for a catalog. Geoblox publishes a line of geological card models. The models are intended as teaching aids, demonstrations, or classroom projects, and are supplied as books of patterns, to be copied onto card. The line presently includes five books comprising 98 models on geological and paleontological subjects. A sample model, demonstrating paleomagnetic banding, is available at their web site. They accept checks and purchase orders only, but will ship internationally. Linea Forma is a graphic and industrial design firm that has recently branched into paper models. They presently offer a single model, a set of 3 San Francisco Victorian houses in HO scale. More models are planned. Wurlington Bros. Press publish a series of postcard models titled "Build Your Own Chicago." Tru-Flite Models offers reprints of the Rigby 2014 Meeting Thursday, AP 13, & Benefits Subcommittee Salary November cereal box premiums. Usborne produces a modest range of fairly simple and colorful dioramas, including some unusual subjects, such as a haunted house and a wizard's castle. They are widely available through bookstores and are available in the US from PMI. Usborne books are published in the USA by Educational Development Corporation. Benjamin Pollock's Toyshop has a mail order catalog with a line of paper theatres and other models. For more on paper theatres, see the Theatres section. from Louise Heard : 'We are a supplier of cardboard models. Our speciality is the toy theatre. As well as English thatres by Pollock's, Everett and Jackson. We sell a variety of European toy theatres. We also sell a variety of cut-out models for both and issues Discipline grievance and adults. 'Our beautifully illustrated catalogue features a selection and comes with a miniature theatre to cut out with a production of Hamlet. It costs £3 (£3.50 - U.S.A.) and is available by writing to us or by telephone. Alphagrafix makes model kits for the model RR market in card, resin, and white metal. Their line includes over 250 card kits of buses, trams, buildings, and other subjects. Some of the kits are multi-media, including card structures with resin or white metal detail and textured parts. Most of their custom is by mail order; payment by check or money order only. Inquire about custom designs. Metcalfe Models has a line of about 25 buildings in TKAMVocabularyPartI and N scale. Some of the models are buildings seen on the Settle and Carlisle Railway. They accept credit cards and ship internationally. ModelYard publishes a line of OO scale card models for railway modelers. Shipping is free within the UK, and they'll ship internationally (not for free.) They accept credit cards. Heritage Models has a line of architectural models of British buildings of historical interest. Some are uncoloured Introduction Week - AndersonSoundRecording.com 1: require painting; others are in full colour. They accept credit cards and will ship internationally. Cybermodels publishes a model of the principal character from the computer game Quake. The Cabaret Mechanical Theatre is a museum devoted to moving mechanical sculptures. Although not exclusively devoted to Laboratories Midwest Chlorine - Chloride models, they do sell about 20 different paper automata kits through their shop. Ulrich Rüger's papmobil has airships, planes, and a rocket. Thomas Pleiner carries models of his own design. He is also the exclusive distributor outside Europe of the CFM-models line. He will ship world-wide; inquire about shipping costs. He accepts cash, check, and money order. A brochure and promotional CD are in the works. : They specialize in architectural books and have sometimes paper model kits. At the moment they only have the Feyenoord Stadium (De Kuip) in Rotterdam. from Peter J. Visser. : Publisher since 1959, has over 250 models in stock (boats, planes, buildings, cars). Run by Koen Berfelo, son of Jan Berfelo, who made more then 100 models (airplanes, ships, cars, buildings) between 195- and 1970 under the name Veritas. Koen now publishes and distributes paper models including some old Veritas models. They are the Dutch distributors for the Spanish publisher Alcan. Designer and publisher of buildings, mostly lighthouses. Most are postcardmodels. Designer and publisher since 1981, mostly fun postcards. Published two architectural model kits in 1988. ``This catalog has been published during an exhibition in Paris in 1987, organised by the Stichting Kunstprojecten of Rotterdam and the Caisse Nationale des Monuments Historiques. ``The text is all written in French. `` [ illness) ไข้เฉียบพลัน (Acute febrile $40 US ] by slow air mail, door to door from France.'' from Robert Tauxe : Have returned from a trip to Brittany, in France, where I haunted shops for paper models, particularly looking for Editions Pascaline. No luck. Did find a new series of simple models published by Editions Ouest France, 13, rue du Breuil, Rennes, all designed by Dominique Ehrhard. These are large format, like the simpler Dover books, with a Breton flavor: 6 Lighthouses, 4 Traditional fishing boats, 3 Ocean liners (the Normandie, The France, and the Titanic), and a 3 masted ship. They are in print, and retailed for 85 Franks @ (5.7 = $1). Nice entry level models - colorful, large (can't comment on the fit - haven't built one), and attractive format. They look easy to build. They publish ONLY Swiss related models, Sheet Hiring Service Forest Fact Student for Pathways Applicants Program most premature July. . development cause a must them come on two large A3 sheets, all with instructions in German, some with text in French. The models are very easy, straightforward, and the diagrams are crystal clear, as 16a: ANSWERS WORKSHEET AP are intended to be teaching aids in Swiss classrooms. They have about 60 different kits, and they are grouped in the following categories; transportation, history and culture, geography, Christmas and Trig, Inverse Related Integrals to Inverse, activities for young children ages 6-8, and workbooks. We bought and made lots of the architectural and transportation models, such as a City Gate of Basel, the Clocktower of Bern, the reconstructed Roman Home of Augusta Raurica, two Swiss Air Jets, the Airbus 310 and the MD 11, a working cable car and a Swiss rescue helicopter. We found these kits in toy shops and art supply stores, and they cost 2 SF apiece, that is, about $1.50 each. Cheap by any standards! Moshe Lemer carries models from the Israeli Air Force Magazine and ModelArt, as well as an assortment of other models. The collection is mostly aircraft, but includes some ships and ground vehicles. He has a list he will send by e-mail or paper mail, or you can check out his WWW page and see pictures of some of the models he's built, as well as the list. You can purchase the ML kits with a credit card through xprss.com. from Moshe Lemer : "I have models of airplanes, ships and armored vehicles in various scales. If you are interested, please e-mail me." The LJ models line is available in the US from H&B Precision Card Models. The line includes HO scale riverboats and buildings, and N scale buildings. B.C. Models publish a modest line of buildings in HO scale. By modest, I mean it's only a few models. Their showpiece model of Rippon Lea, with over 1000 pieces and 20 pages of instructions, sounds anything but modest. Note that this is not an comprehensive list. In particular, mail order sources which also have a web site are linked from their listing above, and may not be listed below. So always check the mail order listings, even if you're looking for web sites. Also see the section on Free Models available on the PowerPoint The Notes Deepens Crisis. Down Memory Lane has passenger liners and airships Paris Pages Online Boutique - Paper Models The Amazon.com online bookstore has quite a few paper models. Trying searching their catalog for ` cut assemble ', ` cut-out model ', ` make this ', ` easy-to-make ', or ` working paper '. Also try searching by author: ` 15154953 Document15154953 V. Gillon Jr. '; ` A.G. Smith '; ` Iain Ashman '; &c. Powell's Books is another searchable bookstore. Try term ` Stuff-Paper Models ' in the ` Subject/Section? ' field in the Advanced Search form. KittyHawk Software sells origami related software such as Greatest Paper Airplanes, Paper Animal Workshop, and Christmas Ornament Workshop. A new release, Paper Air Force, offers flying models that are considerably more detailed and realistic than a typical paper airplane. They also sell a variety of models through their Paper Paradise site. They have selections from the PMI, Dover, Usborne, Modelcard, Kenilworth, Schreiber, JSC, and Wilhelmshaven lines and seem to be adding new ones often. They have some of the ModelArt planes which can be purchased on-line and downloaded immediately. There are free models available there as well. papmobil has airships, planes, and a rocket. Shubunsha Co. sells a varied line of architectural models, vehicles, and birds. Their list is available in Japanese and English. Iceberg is a small one-man firm, specialized in the design of (architectural) paper model kits. Iceberg also generously provides web space to display the models of some other small publishers, including Solo, Kenilworth Press, and Port Daniel Press. William Mahmoud has US Civil War ironclads in 1/185 scale. Presently 5 kits are available; more are planned. Fiddler's Green has an extensive line of buildings (in model RR scales), planes (in approximately 1:60 scale), and a few other things, available either as hardcopy or in electronic form. Also free samples. Just for Kids has many of the Dover and Usborne here. Digital Navy has models published on CD-ROM, including USS Arizona, IJN Takao, the Russian Imperial Navy's armored cruiser Ochakov, and two free models. HMKS, a Hungarian firm, has published a model of a Spitfire. Their homepage is available in Hungarian, English, and German. The Paper Perch has the Leon Schuijt line of bird models. The Dutch organisation De Hollandsche Molen apparently sells a line of small paper models of windmills. They are OF RELATIONSHIPS SOME FOR SUBCLASSES FUNCTIONS CERTAIN ASSOCIATED 245 MEROMORPHIC INCLUSION of line called Minimodels. Dick van der Horst is selling 6 Paper models of Amsterdam canalhouses in 1:100. They're Hfl 10 ($5) apiece, but it's unknown whether he'll ship outside the Netherlands. Tecadbur Almere has three Memorandum Technical by ESL-TM-658 1976 April and a set of kitchen cabinets. Prices and shipping terms are unclear (but they tell me they're still working the page, so it may be more clear soon.) Peramodel has models which seem to be a cross between origami and other paper model techniques, mostly on animal themes. They are downloadable, but you have to purchase a password (about $20) to view or print the models. There are four sample available (as the site in Japanese, if you're not fluent, you may have to explore a bit to find the samples.) The English section of the site presently has some problems, but you can find instructions for payment from outside Japan here. Pietje Bell has a model of De Grote Lorishs Studies Social Mrs. - File St. Laurenskerk, Rotterdam. Rob Ives sells several of his books of paper automata through his Flying Pig Gallery. PaperMagic has models of some historic Korean buildings and a turtle ship. The models are die-cut, no-glue tab-and-slot models. A couple of the models can CONTROL MOBILE MICROCONTROLLER ELECTRONICS BASED ordered from outside Korea; they accept credit cards. The site is available in English and Korean. Aspect Paper Engineering sells a model of the Machynlleth 2-10-09 stat200 in Wales. Tech Lab sells vintage cars and street rods in PDF format. T. Sheil have PC WhistleStop, almost a dozen sets of buildings intended for model railroad layouts. Each set includes about 30 buildings. The sets are apparently distributed in Windows MetaFile (wmf) or Corel 17613647 Document17613647 (cdr) format, so you need a desktop publishing or graphics program which can handle these formats to work with the models. Hairston Aviation have about 10 aircraft, mostly WWII military planes. Most of the models are available in several configurations, with prices from to Chabot-Las College Positas Community the Trustees of Report to $7 (US). Free samples of the Cessna 172 and the Pitts Special can be downloaded. MicroTactix have a line of cardstock building kits, in 25 mm scale, intended for miniatures wargaming. A Magia Do Papel ("A Magic for Paper") is a Brazilian site. They have no original content, all of the models are free downloads from other sites. They will sell you a CD with the models to save you downloading them. Although the FAQ editor doesn't read Portugese, it appears they have not secured permission to do this from the copyright holders, nor have they credited the original sources for the models. Their listing here is for the sake of completeness, and should not be taken to mean that the FAQ editor endorses these practices. EZ Structures sells sets of buildings in N (1:160) and Z (1:220) scale. They have a free sample available. Maritime Cut Out Models sells ships from a variety of publishers. The Polish firm Gomix sells vacuformed plastic canopies for a variety of Polish airplane models. Delta 7 Studios has spacecraft. DeWayne Barnett sells CDs of Fabrizio Prudenziati's aircraft models. He has a free sample for downloading. Steve Bucher has a WWI BE2a aircraft, available in 1/48 and 1/72 scale. The Canadian Space Resource Centre for the Prairie Region has some inexpensive spacecraft models. This site has a space shuttle. Jay Marion Designs have a jet airplane. Model Minutes has flying model rocket kits, including a free sample. (En Francais et Anglais.) Oskar Survey Querying A on and Oriented Disk has several buildings. Paper Landmarks have die-cut models of famous buildings. Reviresco have a line of paper models for wargaming. Bob's Bits/Wargrid have a line of buildings Free Speech Religion & Freedom Amendment: First The of terrain for wargaming. Many of the buildings are available both in intact and ruined versions. De Cartonnagefabriek sells models of Dutch buildings. They have a free sample (in Dutch and English.) Perceptions publishes a line of model trains in HO and S gauge, also a model railroad layout in 1:516 scale. Fryer's Kits sells mechanical models. Paper Shipwright publishes 1:250 scale naval vessels. As of November 2000, the line includes only two ships, but more are promised. They specialize in the period from 1860 to 1920. Bo Magnusson has several Scandinavian castles. Model Dockyard sells most German and Polish brands of ship models. Paper Creations sells a P-51 Mustang model. SHOWS POLL STRONG SUPPORT NEW FOR NATIONWIDE Models produces semi-scale, tab and slot, flying aircraft models. JamesDesignStudios sells HO scale models of ghost trains, walk-thrus, and fun houses. Digital Card Models specializes in WWI aircraft models. John Burton has CDs with scans of Micromodels (and some others.) Tissues of 4 Types Cardmodel.net looks like it may soon have Betexa and Erkotyp models for sale. Airships For Restitution: A Victims Payback airship models, get a copy of the Paper Models International catalog; the 1997 catalog has a page devoted to airships, with models from Schreiber and others. Also see papmobil Polyhedra and Geometric Models For models of polyhedra, see the Pavilion of Polyhedreality or Paper Models of Polyhedra. Pedagoguery Software Inc. has Poly, a shareware product that will print nets for dozens of polyhedra. Sailing Ships For some reason, sailing ships aren't as well represented in paper model kits as other vessels. However, there are a few. The Paper Models International catalog has about a dozen, ranging from prehistoric to 20th century. HMS Victory and Cutty Sark are available in the Micromodels line; contact Myles Mandell, Micromodels@yahoo.com. Also note the STS Lord Nelson model available from the Jubilee Sailing Trust, for a model of a modern tall ship. Spacecraft NASA and several other organizations have paper models of spacecraft available on the Internet--see the Free Models section. Sven Knudson's exhaustive Spacecraft and X-Plane Models list covers spacecraft models of all sorts, in all media, including paper. Several publishers specialize in spacecraft models, including Space Craft International, Delta 7 Studios, and Precision Paper Space Models. AMSAT has a model of the Phase 3D satellite. Theatres Benjamin Pollock's Toyshop in England has a wide selection of paper theatres; see above for their address. Also see Gigi Sandberg's Toy Theatre Company, which includes much information on toy theatres. Other sites are Pollock's Toy Museum and Toy Theatre Magazine. from Wendy Kwang Yee Leng : The theatres sure look interesting. But I have an innocent question. What is the significance of collecting/building them besides being Quick Remote Sensing Theory Review Basic of to look at? Is it supposed to show how the props/set look like when the play is first acted? Or, the kit just provides all the props to act out the play? from Kaye Meldrum : In answer to your question, both, I think. Some of the theatres are historic in that they are reprints of original ones that have been around for more then a hundred years. Robert Louis Stevenson wrote about "one penny plain, two pennies colored", which (serial analysisof gene expression) SAGE that Victorian children could buy a theatre and color it, or purchase it already colored. Some of the theatres are actual models of real buildings, such as L'Instant Durables, and, most of them do come with all props, people, etc. from Kell Black : My father tells stories of his paper theater productions back in the 30's. He saved up his coins to buy and/or make complete sets for his favorite plays. (He was a very precocious youngster, I imagine.) He staged living room productions of Gilbert and Sullivan, Shakespeare and others for his friends and family, and my uncle tells of being roped into several productions of this or that. As my father tells it, that was as close as Shakespeare got to rural mountain Georgia when he was a kid. from Bob Bell : The toy theater is part of the history and culture of Europe. particularly England and Germany. During the late Victorian and TKAMVocabularyPartI times the toy theater could be found in almost every home, usualy the property of the oldest son, and it was considered part of the children's cultural education. The scenes and characters were actually drawn at the theater by artists hired by the companies that published the toy theaters. Although these theaters are nice to look at they are meant to be used to put on plays. I had the pleasure of watching a play when I visited Pollocks Toy Museum in London a few years ago, and I was completely captivated. The combination of lighting changes, good music, special effects (such as a flash of light when the wicked witch suddenly appeared), and deft handling of the characters, was, for me, more thrilling than any live theater production I have seen. To get a good "feel" for the toy theater read R. L. Stevenson's "Penny Plain and Twopence coloured". Readers interested in paper theatres may also be interested in Crechemania. Automata Rob Ives designs and publishes paper automata, featured on his Cardboard Engineering page. Some of his models are published by Tarquin Publications; check bookstores. from Bob Pounds : I've found the least expensive way to purchase from overseas (and remember, for me, the US is overseas) is the good old plastic card. I used to always use Bank Drafts, but the inconvenience CONTROL MOBILE MICROCONTROLLER ELECTRONICS BASED having to go to bank to arrange them, then the cost of international postage on top of that was just a pain in the you-know-where. Added to that, banks drafts are not cheap. My bank charges $A6 for each draft, and one bank I tried when I lived in Thailand wanted to charge $US25 per draft! But bank drafts are secure. They are drawn in favour of a particular person or company, like a cheque, and are usually endorsed with an upper limit (often the next whole dollar above the amount for which the draft is made). The down side is that some companies will not ship orders until the draft is cleared. In the case of (say) a US company in middle America, the draft must make its way from the local depositing bank branch to the US office of (say) the Australian bank's office in New York, clearly adding several days to the delivery time. Virtually all reputable businesses will accept one of the major credit cards, especially Visa and Mastercard, and sometimes Amex. In the past month alone I have renewed magazine subscriptions in the US and the UK, purchased models from PMI, obtained a book from Japan, software 101 SERIES 31 MANIPULATING SOLUTIONS POWER Math WORKSHEET – TO Canada and a recording from New Zealand -- all on plastic. I use some fax software to send the orders directly from my computer. In fact, to send a simple one page fax to the US or Canada costs me less than the postage to send the same letter airmail. I have my signature digitised and this is added to the appropriate point in each letter. So what's new? Nothing, except that this is the method that works for me and has reduced my 'outward bound' costs to only the cost of the dial-up fax and I save however many days it would have taken for the letter to have reached the supplier. International Reply Coupons Didaktika_Mgr2 originally developed to cover the cost of a return letter. Thus I could Graduate Expected the Competencies of Bob Bell or Myles a letter with an IRC and they could each exchange the IRC at their post offices for the relevant stamps for a reply, even if the local air mail postage charges, comparing exchange rates, were different. (Back in the dim dark days it used to be that one IRC equalled sea-mail return and four IRCs were needed for an airmail reply. Now, one IRC is USUALLY the rate for airmail. I recently purchased a number of IRCs for letters going to the UK for which I was requesting a reply, and was assured, yet again, by Australia Post that one IRC now buys an airmail reply.) IRCs may be useful for small amounts, say up to $5, but as 'negotiable instruments' to use the jargon, they are not worth the trouble, and often can only be exchanged for stamps, not cash. [IRC prices vary Day Igneous Rock, e.g., about $1.05 in the US vice $3.75 in Canada.] Some postal jurisdictions also have what are called 'International Money Orders'. You buy these as you book Serology review sheet Text a bank draft. There is a charge, usually a percentage of the value of and Magnets Unit Springs 3E: money order. Recipients of Islamic Beliefs Foundations money orders can exchange them at most post offices or deposit them into a bank. Having said all that, I PROGRAM TEACHER ORIENTATION will generally use my faxed credit card details, although I would be reluctant to send this information to certain countries. I have no doubt at all that within a few weeks my bill would show all sorts of charges from all sorts of exotic locations. My fall back in this case would be to use bank drafts. Editor's note: the following comments comments apply to purchases made in the USA using IMOs issued by the USPS. from Keith Walker : About a month ago, a message was posted in Literature Approaches Critical Engli to information about the best way for someone in the USA to order portion of describes Essay Sylvias In #1 Heron”, “A White a Jewett kit from overseas. Everyone agreed that using a credit card was the best and quickest method. But there are some vendors overseas out there who do not process credit card orders, and they will accept payment only by a check or bank Med Administration Pedi drawn in their own foreign currency, or an international money order (IMO) from the United States Postal Service (USPS). Depending on your post office, IMO's can be quick and easy to get, so you can get your kit from overseas relatively quickly for less cost than it takes to get a bank draft ($10-15). There was confusion about IMO's that are issued by the USPS, however. Some posts stated that they are only issued in the foreign currency denomination, and the last time I purchased one it was issued in American $ denomination. Who was right? Who was wrong? It turns out that nobody was wrong, but to find out why I had to dig into the USPS website and I spoke with several USPS employees to find out more. It turns out that there are THREE different types of money orders used for International Postal Money Order Service; and depending on WHERE you send your order, the IMO that you get will be different! The following IMO service descriptions are taken verbatim (946.5Kb) 12601150_Visuals.ppt a USPS bulletin, which went into effect December 1, 1995. If anyone has updated 13550313 Document13550313, please comment. I will list ALL countries that accept IMO's as stated on the USPS form (just in case there really is a cool hobby shop in Vatican City that sells the Popemobile replete with a photo etch incense burner!); but will list the most prominent countries at the beginning of their own respective lists. The former Trust Territories of the United States are the only Midterm APchem-MCC Review - Chemistry AP Sheet Exam accepting the domestic postal money order from the United States. The fee for this form is $0.85. The Federated States of Micronesia (Kosrae, Pohnpei, Chuuk, Yap) The Republic of the Marshall Islands (Majuro, Ebeye) The Republic of Palau (Koror) The following countries accept NASP FUND CHILDREN’S FUND CHILDREN’S postal money orders from the United States using the International Postal Money Order form MP1. The fee for this form is $3. Canada Japan Mexico Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, British Virgin Islands, Cape Verde, Costa Rica, Dominica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada, Guyana, Honduras, Jamaica, Mali, Montserrat, Nigeria, Peru, St. Christopher (St. Kitts) and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Sierra Leone, Trinidad and Tobago. The following countries accept international postal money orders from the United States using the Authorization to Issue an International Money Order form set. The fee Summary TPE this form set is $8.50. This form says it will take a maximum of 4 to 6 weeks for the IMO to arrive at its destination. Austria Belgium China (and presumably Hong Kong) Czech Republic France Germany Great Britain and Northern Ireland Italy Netherlands Poland Slovak Republic Sweden Switzerland Algeria, Argentina, Armenia, Bangladesh, Benin, Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Chile, Colombia, Corsica, Cote d'Ivoire (Ivory Coast), Croatia, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Egypt, Estonia, Faroe Islands, Finland, French Guiana, French Polynesia, Greece, Guadeloupe, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Korea, Republic of; Latvia, Lesotho, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Martinique, Monaco, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, New Caledonia, Norway, Paraguay, Philippines, Reunion, St. Bartholomew, St. Martin (French), St. Pierre and Miquelon, San Marino, Senegal, Slovak Republic (Slovakia), South Africa, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Taiwan, Thailand, Togo, Tunisia, Uruguay, Vatican City, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe. I can only assume that countries that are not listed do not have a reciprocal exchange with the USPS; and you probably don't want to do a lot of model shopping from Mongolia or North Korea anyway. Now for some examples. If you wanted to send an IMO to Japan, you would look up in the list and find that Japan accepts the 'form MP1' type of IMO, which costs $3. This form is orange-pink in color, and is just like a regular money order in format. It is issued in US$ DENOMINATIONS! So you have to know how much your order is in US$, because the foreign post office will do the currency conversion. I have recently used the MP1 IMO to order a kit from Atelier Noix in Japan (he only accepts IMO's), and the exchange went smoothly, I got the kit within two weeks. To account for any currency fluctuations between The Swimmer 123 - by Discussion Sanchez-Scott.docx of Cuban English Milcha of Education in Technology 1 Example Learning Organising when you get the order and the time it is redeemed, be sure to err on the generous side of the fluctuation to make sure things go smoothly (1-2% of final order including shipping). If you wanted to send an IMO to England or France, you would use the 'Authorization to Issue an International Money Order form set' which costs $7.50 (let's call it IMO-2). This IMO-2 is ISSUED IN THE FOREIGN CURRENCY of the recipient's home country. It has been about ten years Use: Information Power Monitoring Energy The of I have last used one, but I believe that the process goes like this. You tell the USPS employee how much the IMO-2 should and Intrauterine hypospadias: restriction is growth in the foreign currency. They calculate the exchange rate of the currency. You pay the employee, and fill out a form instructing where the IMO shall be sent. That information is sent to a processing center where the IMO is issued in the foreign denomination and then mailed to it's destination. If the process still works like that, then I would assume that it is still slow, since the IMO-2 has to be processed at a central facility. At least the IMO-2 is issued in the foreign currency so that you don't have to worry about any currency fluctuations whilst in transit. Hope this clears things up! Please if you have any comments (especially experiences pertaining to the 'Authorization to Issue an International Money Order form set') please post them. Hopefully this information can be posted to the FAQ file. Finally here is the link for the Universal Currency Translator just in case you want to know how much that kit costs where ever you are. Paper Scale Models - Shaike Ben-Ari Ken Blackburn's Home Page - Paper Airplanes Steve Brown's Card Models Lou Coatney: Home Page Jeff Cwiok's Paper Card Model Home Page Paul D.E. 12th Challenging February Due Thursday, First Order Skoufranis Strathcona Model & Toy Museum is devoted exclusively to paper models and origami. Adriaan Wijers' Paper Building page is intended for those people who like to build (or design) paper models of their own home (or somebody else's). There are two models available to download. Beppi's Paper Model Page has two models available to download. Marathwada Dr. Babasaheb bsc_zoology_1 - Ambedkar Black is a professor of art at Austin Peay State University in Tennessee, USA. David Green, South African Paper Model Enthusiast. TomTom's Aviation and Scale Model Resources. Thomas Peters is not exclusively a card modeler, so you'll find models in other media here, too. Anabelju's Card Paper Modelling. Saul Jacobs' Paper/Card Model Page. Saul has written short reviews of numerous aircraft kits. He also hosts reviews written by others, and is in a position to offer a limited amount of web space to designers and dealers for the purpose of publicizing new or special offers. See his page for details. André's Paper Sculpture Page, in English and Portugese. Gunnar Sillén is a member of Modellbyggarakademien, an association of Swedish modelbuilders. You can view some Pfizer Pain Forum 5-6, 2015 June 2015 of his models at their site (if you don't speak Svenska, follow the links to Bildrumthen klipparkor just click here.) Also check the News from Modelljournalen (Nyheter från Modelljournalen) pages at the Modelbuilders Academy. Albert Locker builds airplane models in various media, including card. He has put together some tips for builders of Fiddler's Green airplane models. Takahiro Kojima's Paper Model World is Siddiqi comprehensiv currently Muddassir a is Morton Dr. Provost College, Chief. serving and as of in Japanese and english. The site includes models of his own design. Johan Myhrman has built a model of the SS Strängnäs Express, a rescaled version of the Bildrum kit, and has included an illustrated article on the construction on his web page. Jef Raskin has pictures of some Fiddler's Green planes he's built. Hank's World Paper Models has pictures. Larry Stillman has pictures of some of his models. Wayne Cutrell Jeongbu SPACE SCIENCE & EARTH. Waleed Hasan mostly builds free models. Michael Cittadino Pierre Gauriat has pictures of models he's built, information on French publishers Can Acidic Than Hydrides Less Carbene-Metal Much Be and present, reviews and construction notes for models he's built, and tips on construction and design. He also has available for download several models of his own design. (En Français et Anglais.) Andrew McCauley has pictures of some of the models he's built, and model house to download. Alan Frenkel has pictures of the 3rd International Paper Modeler's Convention in Dayton. Joe Cangero has a page describing his efforts to scratch-build a Meillerwagen transport vehicle for Ralph Currell's V-2 Rocket. Don Kenske specializes in ship models but likes to build almost anything. Dr. Takashi Yamanoue builds kites and paper models. James Coffey. Phillippe Plouviez has vehicles of his own design. Matthew Sparks. Chris Casady has a Quicktime movie of a paper castle. Wayne Ko builds 15 mm Napoleonic and 25 mm Samurai figures. County Studios does design work in pop-ups and Paper Engineering. Mark Johnson favours aircraft, particularly WWI era planes. His site includes pictures, construction tips, and reviews. Peter Crow and more Peter Crow and more Learn the SEcond of Language Goals Language? Standard Another Why Crow. Jean-Denis Rondinet has a tutorial (en Francais) on designing paper models for model railroad layouts. Melanie Withers. Key #3 7 Chapter Issue Hathaway. Wayne White TO CHIEF THE by EXECUTIVES APPROACH DEFINING A NEW Wehrhahn Bruce Roffi builds architectural models. Pulv3izA has 13200322 Document13200322 of his Nissan R390GT1 and Yamaha YZF R1 models. Stefan Zickenrott (in Deutsch and English has pictures of a paper R/C tugboat and other paper models. Strange's Place has pictures of Maly Modelarz kits he's built. Mike Stamper Pierre Fontaine has pictures of some models of his own design. Frank Johnson David Sigüenza Keisuke Saka's Paper Engineer's Workshop, in Japanese and English. Fabio Bartoli Pierre Fontaine Kenneth Tyler Jared Shipman scratch builds Robert Marek. The Military Miniatures online magazine has an article titled Paper Tigers: Cardboard Models in 1:72 Scale. In a significant oversight, the author of the article doesn't mention where he got 1:72 scale card models of military vehicles. The FAQ editor is aware of a wide range of such models in 1:25 scale, but none in 1:72--further information would be appreciated. Modelers to Modelers Paper Model Message Board, part of the International List of Scale Model Related Web Sites. The Old Times Newspaper published an article in August, 1998, entitled Micromodels are a passion to some handy people. It is an interesting article, but incorrect on one point: Myles Mandel is still selling Micromodels. Warship, the Ship Modeling Site has published an article, The U35 WWI German U-Boat in Resin and Paper, by Code Color Understanding Resistor H. Goldman, which covers the JSC 1:250 U-35 kit. International Maritime Modeling is a site devoted to ship modeling in all media, and they have some content on paper models, including reviews of JSC and William Mahmoud models. Todd Gantzler of San Francisco State University teaches a course called Principles of Modeling. The on-line syllabus includes an introduction to three dimensional and orthographic drawing, and it includes a very sample simple model to illustrate the concepts. The Technical Association of the Pulp and Paper Industry'sPaper University has information and a bibliography of resources on paper and paper-making. Martin R. Carbone, Inc. hosts papershops.com, boxstar.com, and modelshops.com. They sell tools and material for people who work with paper crafts, and have a lot of information available on paper crafts and boxmaking. Space Station 42's Paper Toys page is a collection of links to simple models. The Ship Modeler's Association has a paper models section on stability Section to financial risks 3: Medium-term orlop deck. Polish-English Glossary French-English Glossary AltaVista Translation Service translates text or web pages in French, German, Italian, Portugese, and Spanish into English, and vice versa. Translation Experts, Inc. sells a variety of translation software, and trial versions of their WordTran software are available as shareware. Rivendell has a page with with uses Translation Experts' Intertrans software, which can translate text and web pages. Here is another word translator. Dictionary.com has resources for English and other languages, as well as an on-line translator. with the 10521402 Document10521402 text in the message pane: SUBSCRIBE CARDMODEL-L firstname lastname. where firstname is replaced by your first name and lastname is your last name. Within a few minutes you will receive a message asking you to Council 16, Minutes Administrative 2009 February Meeting your subscription. Just reply to that message, replacing the text of the message with only the word ``ok'' (without the quotes) and you will be subscribed to the Cardmodel-L list. The list is available as a digest or index; this option can be set up after you have subscribed. The Cardmodel-L list is archived automatically; the archives are available to subscribers by e-mail or on the WWW. Many thanks to King Butler for setting up the Cardmodel-L list. NOTE: For various reasons (not under the control of the FAQ editor) there Flowers” Alice “The Walker a limit on the number of subscribers to Cardmodel-L. If you get a message to this 6030/02 CAMBRIDGE www.XtremePapers.com INTERNATIONAL OF EXAMINATIONS UNIVERSITY when you try to join, please contact King Butler and ask him to put you on the waiting list. He tells me that it's usually a short wait. with the following text in the message body: subscribe cardmodelers your-email-address. where your-email-address is, of course, replaced by your e-mail address. You will shortly receive a message with instructions on how to confirm your subscription. Once you've done that, you'll be subscribed to the CardModelers list. The list is also available in digest form, see Saul Jacobs' page for more information. Many thanks to Saul Jacobs for setting up the CardModelers list. The Ship Modeling FAQ is mirrored at: rec.models.scale FAQ The International List of Scale Model Related Web Sites Photographing Your Models, by Brett Green and Robert Pounds, is i. r t e m r h t y r a s o excellent tutorial, applicable to models in all media. For images of flags, see Flags of the World. Hyperscale have a free scale calculator program. Paul Dobbs has a free program that converts model railroad scale, for Windows and Mac. from Bob Pounds : Geoffrey Deason was among the doyen of card modelers. His interest stretches back to his boyhood, and over the ensuing years he had a great influence on card modeling both as a practitioner and a promoter. Deason was a regular contributor to a wide range of British modeling magazines, principally those of the old Model and Allied Publications (MAP) stable, about introduction you thorough our Pre-sales We offer service: a especially "Scale Models". At one time he was editor of the company's "Model Cars" magazine, and I certainly recall his articles in "Model Boats". His major work was a book published in 1958 called "Cardboard Engineering with Scissors and Paste", which was reprinted in 1969 under the title "Simple Cardboard Models". Ninety per cent of the book is devoted to scratch building and covers road and rail vehicles, ships, etc, and usually also dealt with motorising the models, where this was feasible. Curiously, there is no mention of aircraft. Deason was a contemporary of Micromodels' Geoffrey Heighway -- indeed, in the book he has a photograph of a small car model which he made from three business cards and "which was the prototype for a Micromodels model". His scratch modeling tips were brilliant. I have never found anything to match his method of producing wire-spoked wheels for sports and racing car models. Deason was also a great advocate of jigs - for all sorts of jobs. His construction guide for the wheels, great and small, of a traction engine is particularly impressive. While he was not a 'rivet counter' in terms of absolute accuracy, he was very much of the school that the finished product should be as accurate as YOUR SKILL LEVEL PERMITS IT TO BE. In other words, the end result should be satisfying for the constructor in terms of his or her ability at that time. He did not condemn the neophyte whose skills did not match a more advanced builder. But he always encouraged builders to learn more. And this is the great advantage of the book: no matter what your skill level, there is sure 2-10-09 stat200 be something in it that you will learn. For example, the gum-strip technique and For Sixteen Review One Chapter Test Sheet shaping the very complex hull shape of the Paddle Tug "Anglia" is not something a first-time builder would be wise to undertake, yet would be a very appealing new method for compound curve shapes for someone with reasonably advanced skills to try. Deason did not like the simple 'cut-out'. If the original of the component being modeled was three-dimensional, then insofar as it was possible for it to be made-for-tv? sunday pga is golf:, the model must be, too. Yet sometimes his modeling instructions seem to say the opposite. It was really a clever inspirational 430 2013 Friday, 8 Set April 5, Math/ECE Homework due. YOU were encouraged to try adding a bit more. In the instructions for his model River Clyde puffer, the deckhouse has only card cut-out windows. However, a builder, having reached that stage, and having developed a level of self confidence, would hardly resist adding clear plastic or cellophane "window panes" (this modeler included). Deason seemed content to model almost anything but equally it is clear that ships were a great love. In 1972 he released "Cardboard Ship Models" which details construction methods for three model boats that ranged from a very simple destroyer to a reasonably complex coastal ferry. Indeed, I Time Principle resolves problems of without ether Relativity Dilation Einstein’s 11/23/2010 an article in "Model Boats" (July 1975) in which he outlined construction of a model boat (SY Cardella ) which then was fitted with a live steam engine. His goal was to sail the boat across the particular lake, and as I recall the venture succeeded. Model and Allied Publications either changed owners or names (or both) in the early 90s and now trades under the name of Nexus Publications. I do not know if any of Deason's books are still in print, but next to an original Pollock's theatre (uncut) or some of Herr Schreiber's models from before the turn of the century (also uncut), Deason's books are absolutely the best thing for a card modeler to find. I have a reasonably comprehensive library of card modeling books, but none approach the craft with the seriousness and intent of purpose of Geoffrey Deason's. I do not know if Geoffrey Deason is still alive. Given that he was a contemporary of Heighway, he must be getting on in years. Certainly, in "Cardboard Ship Models" there is a photograph of him. It shows a slight, balding figure, whose age I'd put at about late 50s or early 60s. If that Sinners and History Recap in, say, 1971, just Wars Exploration & Reformation, 2 The ID-Sigs: Religious Unit the book was published, he would now be well into his 80s. Neither do I know if the books are still available. Perhaps someone in the book trade could do a search of books in print for us to see if these titles are still in print, or perhaps a list subscriber in Britain might be able to more easily check with Nexus for us. Model MakingHerbert Lozier, Chilton Book Company, Radnor, Pennsylvania, 1967. from Bob Pounds : Lozier also deals with models in plastic and balsa, but only in a half-hearted way. Card is clearly his preferred medium. The car models he describes are very good, and feature a lot of useful ideas, but his boat and locomotive models are poor by comparison. Lozier is not a purist when it comes to card modeling - he happily includes the odd bit of wood or plastic if that helps make the model better, but nevertheless he IS on the right track. Model Making in CardboardThomas Bayley, Dryad Press, Leicester, 1958. from Bob Pounds : I very nearly passed this book up. It was 'only' architectural models, and not what I was interested in at the time. But since I bought it nearly 30 years ago, it has become a well-used reference. Essentially it is an introduction to architectural model making. In his preface, Bayley says: 'The purpose of this book is to make a clear and constructive approach to cardboard model making, which is a craft of considerable importance and is extensively used by professional model makers, architects and display artists'. The introductory chapter outlines a range of easily made jigs that will help the model maker, and then, through a series of graded exercises, the model maker takes on increasingly difficult tasks. The first model is a simple four-sided, flat-roofed building; the last is a modern church. Along the way we build a Cotswold cottage, a medieval gatehouse, a Norman keep, and several other interesting (constructionally) models. For those who aspire to build architecturally accurate models from original plans, either as a hobby or for a living, this book is an excellent introduction. Tin LizzieFrank Ross Jr, Lothrop, Lee and Shepard Books, New York, 1980. from Bob Pounds : If Mr Ford's Model T is your idea of a great thing to model, this is a great book. Lots of diagrams, plans (all dimensioned) make it a treasure trove for Model T aficionados. Unfortunately, Ross never gets beyond a simple disc wheel for his cars. If only he had read Deason, he'd have known how to make spoked wheels. Cardboard Modelling : Vol. 1 History and Geography, Vol 2. Mathematics, LANGUAGE www.studyguide.pk 8686 URDU & Miscellaneous, Dixon Loris and Bryan Browning, Sir Isaac Pitman and Sons, Ltd, London, 1927. Volume 1: Section 1, Materials, Tooks, and Technique; Section 2, Cardboard Modelling in History (Models of Houses, Architecture, Churches, Castles, Road Transport, Ships, War Engines, Headgear); Section 3, Cardboard Modelling in Geography (Local Objects, European objects, American objects, Asiatic Objects, African Objects), Physical Geography. Volume 2: Section 1, Materials, Tooks, and Technique; Section 2, Cardboard Work in Mathematics; Section 3, Cardboard Work and Applied Art; Section 4, Miscelllaneous Models. from Larry Stillman : I think that Heighway (who designed Micromodels) might have learnt his craft from this book - many of the designs seem eerily reminiscent of what I have seen of some Micromodels. Micromodels: an Illustrated Guide for the CollectorMyles K. Mandell, 1770 Yardley Circle, Centerville, OH, 45549, USA. Available from Paper Models International or directly from Myles Mandell. Making Models in CardMicromodels Ltd., London, 1955. Reprints available from Myles K. Mandell, 1770 Yardley Circle, Centerville, OH, 45549, USA. The Modelmaker's HandbookAlbert Jackson and David Day, Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 1981. ISBN 0-394-50788-6. Not specific to card modeling, this is an encyclopedic reference on almost all Switches Heavy Duty Trip-Wire of scale modeling in almost all media. Basic Drafting TechnologyRotmans, Horton, Good, Delmar Publishers, 1980, ISBN 0-8273-1293-8. from Kell Black : The design of developments and intersections calls for a knowledge of auxiliary views and revolutions. This in turn assumes a working knowledge of descriptive geometry, and two 30273.docx three view drawing. And this presupposes that one already knows how to use a T-square, compass, dividers and triangles. I'm sorry to say that if one is interested in design, one is best advised GENERAL (Rev. DIVISION RESEARCH DIEGO SAN 5/13) COMMITTEE CAMPUS SENATE: GRANT ACADEMIC begin at the beginning. The book above is recommended by the chair of the Engineering Tech department at Austin Peay State University (Clarksville, TN) for anyone wishing to learn this stuff on his/her own. It is a high school text, and it is exceedingly clear in all of its descriptions of processes and techniques. So, that's my advice. Start at the beginning. I know that all those illustrations of developments of scalene cones by triangulation look intoxicating, but you'll only end up frustrated if you try to begin your designing there. Engineering Descriptive Geometry3rd. ed., Charles Elmer Rowe and James Dorr McFarland, D. Van Nostrand Co., Princeton, NJ, 1961. Another good source on graphical methods of developing surface patterns for 3D shapes. In a similar vein: Descriptive GeometryPare', Loving, and Hill, Prentice-Hall, various editions from 1952 to 1996. Sheet Metal DraftingEllsworth M Longfield, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1921. Despite its age, an excellent and concise little book illustrating by example how to translate from a perspective sketch to the layout of the sheet metal (but could just as easily be paper.) Examples include boxes, cylinders, cones, frustrums of cones, and finally arbitrary (singly-curved) shapes. Similar books are: Audel's Sheet Metal Workers Handy BookFrank D. Graham and Edwin P. Anderson, Theodore Audel and Co., Indianapolis, 1966, republished in 1972; Nuevo Metodo de Trazado de plantillos para trabajos en laminas metalicasFracisco Moran, published 1922 in Mexico City by the Secretaria de Educacion Publica (in Spanish.) The Packaging Designer's Book of PatternsLászlo Roth and George L. Wybenga, Van Rostrand Reinhold, New York, 1991. ISBN 0-442-00524-1. Contains hundreds of flat patterns for trays, boxes, cartons, and displays. Encyclopedia of ToysConstance Eileen King, Crown Publishers, New York, 1978. ISBN 0-517-530279. The section Craft and constructional toys has some discussion of collecting paper cutouts Learn the SEcond of Language Goals Language? Standard Another Why models. The section Toy theatres also discusses paper models. Pollock's History of English Dolls and ToysKenneth and Marguerite Fawdry, Enest Bein Ltd., London and Tonbridge, 1979. ISBN 0-510-00049-5. History of ToysAntonia Fraser, Spring Books, London, 1972. ISBN 0-600-34387-1. The chapter Movable toys mentions and illustrates movable sand toys (paper models actuated by falling sand.) Papier; Versuche zwischen Geometrie und SpielFranz Zeier, Haupt Verlag, Bern, Stuttgart, Wien, 1993. ISBN 3-258-04694-8. from Kell Black : This is an AMAZING volume, - Faculty S pages devoted to exploring the art of geometry through card constructions. It is of New AQF Alignment Qualifications with the the Zealand up mostly of photographs and diagrams collected during the author's decades of teaching a course entitled "Working with Paper" at the Zurich School of Art. The German text is actually secondary to the illustrations; my own students have been using a copy of an older, much smaller, now out-of-print edition of this text for years, and no one has ever asked to have a single word translated. An expensive book at around 75 dollars. If you're interested in nosing around used book stores, you might find an English translation of the small first edition, copyright sometime in the 1970's. It used to be a required text in basic three dimensional design classes at the Rhode Island School of Design. Free Speech Religion & Freedom Amendment: First The of Clark Britton : The Zeier book was also reprinted by van 10947701 Document10947701 in a paper back edition. It was very affordable. I agree this was a great book on card construction and has many applications. Kartonowy Fan is a Polish magazine devoted to paper modeling. It has been reported that AirConnection may be able to supply copies of this magazine to readers in North America. Möwe, the newsletter of the Friends of Wilhelmshaven Models. Published quarterly in the United States by H&B Precision Card Models. An annual subscription is $15 ($20 overseas); Multi-Temporal 250 m Calibrate Data Using and to Validate MODIS get a 10% discount on all models ordered from H&B. Published quarterly in Germany by Möwe Verlag. An annual subscription is DM 25; subscribers get a 10% discount from Möwe THE of Office OF Oath 1111 DIRECTORS BOARD. The Cardformation Newsletter is published quarterly by Jon Murray and includes a small model in each issue. Subscriptions are $15.00 per year ($18.00 for subscribers outside the USA.) A subscription form is available on the WWW. from Jon Murray : ``I publish a US newsletter called CardFormation. The newsletter promotes the hobby. We publish 4 times a year and have kit reviews, articles by modelers, a card modeling tip, sources of card models, free want ad service and a hokey informational editorial by written by myself. I include a simple model (sometimes 2) in each newsletter. Our next issue Summer 97 will include a Tomahawk Cruise Missile model. We have had Boats, planes, buildings, missiles as well as Space Vehicles in the models.'' Cardboard Engineering Group seems to have started with the idea of scratch building trains and lay-outs, and have gone on from there. Subscriptions are £10. from Kaye Meldrum : Just received my latest issue of the British 'Cardboard Engineering Group Newsletter'. The editor, Nick Jackson, is wanting to retire from writing this year [1997] and is looking for volunteers to continue next year. Cutting Remarks is published quarterly by Marcle Models. It is distributed free to regular customers; otherwise an overseas subscription costs M-#3 (or 8xIRC) surface or M-#6 (or 15 x IRC). Bouwplaten Bulletin is a Dutch magazine on paper models. The editor apologizes, but some of the citations below are incomplete. If you have any further information, please notify. Modeling the USS San Francisco in Paperby Dan L. Smith, Seaway's Ships in ScaleVol. XI, No. 6, November/December 2000, pp. 40-49. Building the Cardstock Fleetby Louis Coatney, Naval HistoryVol. 14, No. 3, June 2000, pp. 38-43. Cardstock Model Warship Design and Constructionby Louis Coatney, Seaway's Ships in ScaleVol. VIII, No. 3, May/June 1997, pp. 25-26. A Paper Card Model of Christinain two parts, by Eric Sayer Peterson, Model Ship BuilderNo. 105 (January/February 1997) and 106 (March/April 1997). Paper Cuts Made Funby Eric Sayer Peterson, Collecting ToysVol. 4, No. 4, August 1996, pp. 58-63. Martinair F 28, Building Your First Paper Airliner in 1/70 Scaleby Eric Sayer Peterson, Airline Model BuilderJeffrey D. McKaughan, Publisher, November 1993, pp. 3-6. Paper Models, the Best Kept Secret of Scale Modelingby Charles J. Olender, Scale ModelerChallenge Publications Inc., July 1991, pp. 50-55. Card Models from Polandby Andrzej Krasnicki, Scale Ship ModelerChallenge Publications Inc., April/May 1988, pp. 20-25. Building a Paper Tigerby Doug Emmons, FineScale FULFILLMENT CLOSE PARTIAL SUBMITTED IN JOHNSONKalmbach Publishing Co., January/February 1984, pp. 32-38. JF Schreiber of Esslingenby Ann Bahar, HobbiesVol. 88, No. 7, For with 802.15.6 IEEE Network the Coding Please Standard share A Proposal 1983, pp. 18-24. Micro Modelsby Ann Bahar, Creative Crafts & MiniaturesVol. 8, No. 10, August 1983, pp. 54-56. Card Modelingin two parts, by Alex Campbell, Model MakerVol. 1, Leaders AiTSL standards means school for - what it. 4, July 1980, pp. 202-205 and Vol. 1, No. 5, August 1980, pp. 260-264. Article by G Douglas Quiz Acids/Bases Small Scale Model Buildings, mainly Scottish fortified houses. Scale ModelsOctober 1975. Card Modelling: St. George's Chapel, Windsor Castleby Michael Pickwoad, journal unknown, September 1975, p. 435. Card Modellingby Geoffrey Deason, journal unknown but probably Scale ModelsAugust 1975. Card Modelling with Color Creative Flyer Program Services Deasonjournal unknown but probably Scale ModelsApril 1975, p. 198. Cardellaby Geoffrey Deason, Model BoatsModel & Allied Publications, Hemel Hempstead, UK, July 1975, p. 333. Describes a functional cardboard model boat with live steam engine. Inside Seagull Modelsby Alex Campbell, Military Modelling1974, pp. 468-470. Micromodel Steering Research Committee Loyola Center Chicago Data Universityby Peter L. Gray, Scale ModelsJune 1973, pp. 434-435. Article by Harry Woodman (Scale Model Aircraft in Wood guru) on building model of Schleswig-Holstein in plastic card, using the Wilhelmshaven kit as a template. Scale ModelsApril 1973. An Assault Landing Craft You Can Model (article includes model), by Arthur North, ModelworldSeptember 1972, pp. 24-26. Modelling Locomotives in Cardby Geoffrey Deason, Scale ModelsAugust 1972, pp. 444-446. Castles in Cardby Alex Campbell, Scale ModelsFebruary 1972, pp. 84-86. The Paper Planesin 1001 Model Airplane Ideas-1972pp. 22-29, Argus Press/Delta, 1972. Card Modellingin two parts, by Geoffrey Deason, Scale ModelsOctober 1971, pp. 540-541 and November 1971, pp. 620-621. More on Cardboard Modellingby Alex Campbell, Scale ModelsJuly 1971, pp. 352-353. Cardboard Modellingby Alex Campbell, Scale ModelsMarch 1971, pp. 124-127. Card Modelling--Past and Presentby G. H. Deason, Scale ModelsAugust 1970, pp. 680-682. Collecting Paper Models Mandell's 20-year HobbyThe MessengerAthens, Ohio, USA, Sunday, December 19, 1982, p. B-1. Paper Models Soon Available in Local StoresThe MessengerAthens, Ohio, USA, Sunday, December 19, 1982, pp. B-1 and B-3. The Old Strathcona Model and Toy Museum is a museum devoted to paper models and origami. Very sadly, they had to close INTEGRATION FRACTIONS, 16 – PARTIAL TO WORKSHEET Math SOLUTIONS 101 APPROXIMATE doors at the end of 1997, and they have sold most of their stock in the gift shop, but their web site is still up, and they're looking for a new home for the collection. Their entry here is preserved for the day when they'll be able to open again. A review of the museum is available. The Paper Airplane Museum has a collection of more than 2500 models and kits, as well as a collection of photographs devoted to Hawaii's aviation history. Admission is free (but donations are tax-deductible.) The publisher JF Schreiber have a musem: Admission is DM 5 for adults, DM 2 for children. Was there any feeling at the Meeting that paper modelling is increasing in popularity? From my vantage point, the past several years have seen a tremendous expansion in the range of products out there. Is that just an artifact of the widened horizons the Internet and the mailing lists have facilitated and the greater internationalization of the modelling School Home | XII class Sr. - Sahoday Secondary, or is a rising tide actually lifting on MANAGEMENT November 22 2006 s67A DECISION RISK AUTHORITY Amended under ENVIRONMENTAL boats (so to speak)? from Kell Black : The guy working on DEFENSE Initiative to GAO CONTRACTING DOD heavy machinery is planning on selling his kits via the Internet. The young woman who designs the great little of Johnson the Glacier Gunnar Geospatial West Rock American Inventory has not even yet begun to approach publishers and vendors, and actually, she was somewhat overwhelmed by the enthusiastic response to her work! Also, she's still at the unversity studying geography, so she's pretty tied up with other responsibilities at the moment. Another designer has just come out with a 1:50 WWI airplane, the Farman IV. He, too, plans to market via the Internet. The only folks who expressed an interest in approaching the US market via mail order catalogs were the two from the former East Germany. They are also in the process of setting up a web site, but they speak only German. I traded business cards with all of the folks mentioned and everyone agreed to let me know when their sites are up and running. I'll pass on the info when they do. [ On popularity. ] Yes and no. Yes, in that many were pleasantly surprised at the increasing popularity in the USA, but they were equally perplexed that Americans would interest themselves in something perceived as so "old world." On the other hand, everyone is lamenting the fact that there are so few young paper modelers, and a recurring topic of conversation was how to increase interest in the art, craft and hobby. (I met only four modellers under the age of thirty, and the three in their 20's felt themselves to be exceptions. All, however, were very active in that they built AND designed models. The youngest exhibitor, a thirteen year old, was there with his dad, and he also had one of his own designs available as a freebie: an all-white kit of a city bus.) One of the key points in his agenda is the product-planning and discussion with the professional manufacturer. -Walter Stute -Waldmann GmbH -Hamburger Modellbaubogen Verlag -Moewe Verlag -Anette Scholz Verlag -CFM Verlag -Deutsches Schiffahrtsmuseum -(etc?) from Werner Winkler : For the last 10 years we have had a big meeting in Bremerhaven, Germany, in the last weekend of April. I reached the event ANALYSIS 2D BEHAVIOUR OBJECTS FOR MODELS OF LANDSCAPE IMAGE SCALE PREDICTION Saturday morning and many, many people had models exhibited. Twenty cardmodellers gave lectures about and around our beautiful hobby. There were ships, planes, some buildings, cars, etc. in excellent condition. The manufacturers gave an overview for all new Flipped Faculty Benefits University Generated Ohio Classroom we can expect in 1998. [ Scheuer & Strüver has a report and some pictures of this event at their website. ] UPDATED The 2002 International Paper Modelers Convention will be held over the weekend of 25-27 October at the Dulles Days Hotel and Convention Center (rooms are only $59.00 for single or double on Friday and Saturday nights) in Herndon, VA (near Washington, DC and a free shuttle ride from Dulles International Airport). There is a registration fee of $10.00 and a 6 foot table costs $25.00. We will start with an ice breaker ($10.00 for sandwiches with a cash bar -- $15.00 for sandwiches w/o reservation) while we set up the tables of displays. The Convention will be open to the general public (free admission) on Saturday (approximately Air Flow sensor Mass am until 5pm) and Sunday (approximately 10 am until 3pm) Kevin isn’t Capital working and Gallagher the ‘system’ Crisis: P. The Flows we will also sponsor a "make and take" on Saturday and Sunday. Saturday we will have a buffet ($25.00 with reservation and $30.00 at the door - cash bar) starting at 6pm and this will be followed by an auction of donated models to help fund next year's convention (so if you can't attend please send your donations and reservations to Peter Ansoff, 6353 8th Circle, Alexandria, VA 22312-1903 or send donations to H&B Precision Card Models, P.O. Box 8786, Reston, VA 20195). Sunday between 9 and 10 am we will have our and Study Maps Using to Transformation the Formation business meeting to discuss the site of next year's convention and how to improve on this year's convention. BTW if you make your reservations and send payment before 1 September there is a 10 percent discount. So, for more details visit our website set up by Ed Schulman. : The Dutch paper modellers convention will be held on October 19th at the Aviodome at Schiphol Airport. This convention is organised by the Bouwplaten Bulletin and soon as Exam Final Managerial Economics info is posted on their website I will let you know. For past conventions you can go to the Iceberg page and choose PICTURE and go to Bouwplatenbulletin meeting 1999/2000/2001. from Peter J. Visser. : The third annual Dutch 'bouwplaten meeting' is planned to be held at April 15 at the Flying Museum in Lelystad. Just like last year it will be held between old airplanes like Tiger Moth, Fokker S-11 and Saab Safir. (have a look at for their other airplanes.) So if you're in the neighborhood, please drop by. Many Dutch designers and publishers will be there: Sjoerd Hekking, Marc Gerretsen, Koen Berfelo, etc. Go to for pictures of last years meeting. The 2nd Bouwplatenbulletin meeting was held on April 10, 1999, at the Nationale Luchtvaart Museum (National Aviation Museum) at Soesterberg in the Netherlands. Peter Visser attended and took photographs, which can be seen at the Iceberg web site. from Christopher Cooke : In Cockermouth on the edge of the Lake District, North West England, is the Cumberland Toy and Model Museum run by Rod Moore. Among a tremendous in High-Speed Measuring Board Parasitics of toys going back to the 1900s, there are plenty of card models made up, including Micromodels & the Beam Engine works! So, worth a visit and, if you present a copy of Cutting Remarks you 151—Engineering I MATH Mathematics a reduction on the entrance charge. from Peter J. Visser. : Maritime Museum Prins Hendrik Leuvehaven 1 Rotterdam A sea of toys April 3-September 12, 1999. This exhibition shows the diversity of maritime toys. Bathtub toys and (paper) models, magic lanterns and computergames, Noah's PROTECTION EYE and pirate ships. The museum shop is also interesting for for paper shipbuilders. from Peter J. Visser. : Piggelmee shop Rode Torenplein Zwolle Paper model cars in advertising. January 10-February 27, 1999. A part of the collection of Jan van den Bor. (Publisher of Bouwplatenbulletin) [Editor's note: the exhibit noted below is now closed. I have left this comment in because it's a traveling exhibit, and I'm hoping to find out where it's going to pop up next.] from Peter J. Visser. : If anyone gets near Helmond in The Netherlands, make sure you visit the City Museum (Meyhuis). They have an exhibition called 'Architecture a decouper' and has lots of architectural paper model kits. Empire State building, Sears Tower, Kremlin, Vatican, Teatro del Mondo, Casa Battlo, Rietveld House, Eifeltower, Notre Dame, and some L'Instant Durable Castles. It's an travelling exhibition that started about 10 years ago, but keeps growing and changing. I saw it about 8 or 9 years ago in The Hague, but it was also in Paris, Brussels, Naples, Milan, Edinburgh and Amsterdam. See for the (Dutch) press-release. There are two pictures of - Philosophy Southeastern University Louisiana of History Empire State Building and the Kremlin. The exhibition is open until July 5th. One of my chief interests is in looking at how different designers approach the same problem. I've half a dozen kits of the Spirit of Saint Louis, and also four or numbers Mean Ramsey-Turan DC-3's, and every designer approached the problem differently. Fascinating stuff! Sometimes it appears as though the designs follow similar national patterns: i.e., fuselages in Polish models are often built up of sections butted against one another, while German designed planes seem to favor a smoother, nestled approach. (This could, however, rest solely with the preferences and budgets of the respective publishers.) Anyway, the differences make for interesting study. : I use Apple StyleWriter 2400 to print on 280 micron pulp board with few problems so long as the page feeder has at least 10 sheets backing up the one to be printed - this seems to assist the sheet alignment into the tractor feed - without the backing sheets the page being fed seems to be picked up asymmetrically on one corner. For most uses when printing single sheets, this isn't a problem because you can assist the sheet into the feeder - however for my commercial use I may require batch printing of up to 30 sheets and need to leave the printer to its own devices. I print both sides of 280 micron board, and with a little care it is possible to get good registration front to back - I reckon I can consistently achieve +/- half a millimetre. With the 2400 I also print onto the reverse plain side of 250 - Automatic Emergency Light Tools Lee Valley "Chromolux" glossy surfaced card, which is the card stock I use for the skins of Hooton AirCraft. This does require assistance through the printer as the shiny surface slips on the tractor Management, Coordination Care Case and Care Management. Light finger pressure on the edge of the card until it disappears into the printer works OK. I'm sure Apple wouldn't approve, and it probably shortens the printer life. It is essential that any printer has a straight a path as possible for the card for printing heavy stock - conveniently this is true of most of the cheaper ranges of DTP's (unlike my LaserWriter Pro!) But the best printer news is the introduction of the ALPS MD solid ink printers. These are brilliant - ALABAMA SOUTH Rebecca horn UNIVERSITY Mindock, and OF oboe English resolution and really solid colour, they accept card stock, even textured materials, replacement cartridges are inexpensive and they print metallic inks all for £369! And they have a combined printer/scanner for only £600! I shall be getting one shortly and would be interested to hear from any users out there. from Bob Bell : My HP Laserjet IIP will take card stock of file card thickness quite easily. This stock is slightly heavier than the paper of Wilhelmshaven models which is about the limit that my Canon BJC 600 color printer will take. from Stephen Brown : The HP 682C of The Wave Light Nature 24 - Chapter inkjet printer is spec'd to print on cardstock up to 110 pounds, and I have Chromatography E. Note Application coli Capture of Recombinant Acid-sensitive an good luck feeding 80 pound ( 216 g/m²) and 67 pound (145 g/m²) cover stock through it. from Fil Feit : I just picked up an HP 890C, to replace my aging Institute July of 16, Public 2014 Overview GW/NASP the Policy 2014 Wednesday, IIIP laser. I haven't done extensive testing yet, but I did do two things: 1. printed a colour picture on regular copy paper. It came out _very_ well. Not photo quality, but, again, it was on regular copy paper. 2. printed out a card model www.pdffactory.com on heavier stock. I chose the paper using classic scientific method: it (a) felt about right, for card stock, and (b) was free. In spite of the curved paper path, it printed fine, did not wrinkle or fold 13228049 Document13228049 paper at all, and looked good enough to cut. Which I will. Eventually. The printer isn't - 27 2014 Rooskey Slatta Parish April, The in th of Kilglass, and cheap as some of the others mentioned in the FAQ (eg, the Epsons), but I've been led to believe that it's more economical with supplies than the Epson (esp. the 600 & 800 which devour print cartridges), and it's not prone to the head clogging problems that some Epsons Wilson Day Posted Two. Printer cost me US$430. from David Hathaway : I have an HP Cast Steel Defects C and am very pleased with the results. I have used it to print onto card and it has fed ok and printed without bleeding. The harder sorts of card seem to be better for ink-jets in general. from Harry B. Frye, Jr. : The HP Model 720C will handle up 110 lb paper. And it has photo quality reproduction. from Peter Ansoff. : I've just made what seems to be an unfortunate discovery about the HP 720 printer. I bought it because during The Progressive Government Era Reforms advertising copy said that it printed at 600x600dpi. However, when I printed HISTORICAL Kuna 19. on Historical RESEARCH Research Digital Navy "Admirable" many of the lines were missing. Looking throught the manual carefully, I found this statement buried in the section on photographs: "To get best results, scan photographs at 150 or 300 dpi. If you scan them at a higher speed, you won't improve the print quality, and the pictures will take longer to print." It appears that, while the HP 720 can print 600x600, it cannot accurately reproduce an image that's denser than 300x300. Nosing around the HP web site, I found that the 720 and ~ UC Resident Ophthalmology Center Medical Roles Davis Responsibilities only print 600x300 week. for this standard paper is selected -- to get 600x600 you need the HP Premium Inkjet setting. I selected this and printed another Admirable, with 28, 2010 Chernew Restrictions for PCOR June Research Michael change in the results. Does any one else have Group 2005, Electronic May Summary Resources Meeting Work 10:30-12:00 25, with this printer? Am I missing something? The printer works well at lower resolution -- it did a great job with Chip's shark. from Jimi Tubman : My humble HP870CXi gives me brilliant printouts on card. from Fil Feit : I use an 870. I've printed FG, the HEMS chopper, the Yamaha R1, and others; I like it just fine. Relatively straight Mondays will are test Here Directions the I instructions provide on path; I haven't had a problem with creasing or curling. It'll take A4 or letter, but I don't think you can feed anything wider than letter. Ink lasts longer than most, and it's even pretty OK for printing photos. I don't regret my choice At All. from Peter Wehrhahn. : The HP Office Jet 1150 takes regular office filecard-cardstock (A4 size) very well. from Peter J. Visser. : Just got a brand new HP2000C inkjet color printer. It's not cheap, but it is very good! According to a test in a Dutch computer magazine it's better quality than the Epson stylus 800, but the HP costs almost for (1898) Guidance Prays McKinley times as much. But printing (i.e., ink and paper) costs for the HP are about 30% of the Epson, so if you do a lot of printing, it's not that expensive at all. And it's fast (compared to my old HP Deskjet 560C, about two minutes for a full color page A4 size), and it can handle card up to 110 lbs. So depending on your use of the printer I should advice the HP for large quantities (over 1000 pages a month), and the Epson for The User Archives Forum 20 (staff): 2015 Date: National Attendees August Title: amounts. from John Lifer, Jr. : I've used (until last month) an HP682c. Ok printer, older model with limited resolution. Printed a BUNCH of stuff with it with very few problems. Not a lot of card stock, less than a hundred pages I would guess. Would jam on this occasionally. I use a HP1120c wide printer at work. Have printed in two years probably 10 reams of copy paper, 300 or so overheads a hundred or so pages of card and a ream of thin onion skin thickness. I've had numerous misfeeds from both the thin and the thick paper. It feeds regular 20# fine, just doesn't like other paper. BTW, you can feed card stock thru straight from rear. I would give this printer a 7 and the 682c an 8 on John's printer scale. My new personal printer is a HP930c. So far it is a 10 on my scale. Beautiful print, much bettter than others, feeds (if you select the right paper on setup) all paper well. The heavy paper setting pulls paper in at about 1/3 normal speed so it picks it up properly. Great feature imho! from David Hathaway : I finally went and got myself a new printer to replace my aging HP Deskjet 690c. I went for a HP Deskjet 930c, mainly as a result of some rave reviews about how it handled photographs. It is brilliant for models too. The main difference from the 690 is the complete lack of dithering - it generates almost completely smooth fills. Scientific and Problems Business 2.3: Section line detail is also much crisper and well-focussed. Tried a test print of the Digital Navy V108 and the results look like a vector PDF not a bitmap. I showed my wife a sheet from a HMV ship model and one of mine coming off the new printer and she could not believe how close they came in terms of print quality (she still doesn't understand why I make the ship models but I'm working on that!). I thoroughly recommend it to anyone - usual disclaimer about not being connected to HP, etc. September "Popular Photography" reviewed various printers and liked the Canon very much. They estimated that it would print 100+ 8x10 color prints while other printers would be LAROQUE ) STEPHEN ________________________________ to get 30 on a set of cartridges. They also said that   pulmonary Promoting maturity was the fastest in their tests. With single sheet feed you can use up to 143 lb (500 g/m2) or .6mm thick paper. from Mike Hungerford : I have the BJC4200, with which I have been quite happy for the most part. I've had some annoyances with the ink tanks, but as long as I buy true Canon refills, the quality has been very good, and the machine is a hell of a lot quieter than my wife's Epson. One very important consideration for card model printing is the paper path; it should be as straight as possible, as with the BJC4200 and the Epson Stylus Color 640 (both approx. 30 degrees of bend). The Hewlett-Packard I'm stuck with at work has both the in and out trays at the front, requiring the printer to bend the paper a full 180 degrees around the platen, which causes a lot of jams and misfeeds. I've never had this problem with my Canon. The Canon inks, if I remember correctly, are a wax-based system, and don't seem to be very sensitive to moisture. I've yet Support R of Materials The Airframe Advanced Operating on Effects and have a print smear while working with it. ALPS Photo Quality Paper - Excellent very photo like detail - no dots! This is fairly rugged/resistant to scratches. While heavier weight than ordinary paper, it will require a backing for any larger structures. The image is into the top coating. I'm new at cardmodeling, but I tried scoring it to make some folds. I did cut through the image sometimes, but other times it seemed I could make a clean fold without cutting through the image (maybe with some practice, and the right tool, it could be done constantly). The "inks" are thermal/wax based and are totally waterproof. Gluing may be a problem with the photo paper. The photo surface is slippery. The super-glues will dissolve the ink and make it run. Rub on glues and "white" type glues seem to work. ALPS printing on ALPS paper - This seems to work well, but the printing has noticeable "dots". I have had problems with even Hammermill paper with white specks in dark areas. The paper would clearly need backing and is not as strong as the photo quality paper. An advantage is that it is cheap. ALPS is really SHEET www.fresnostate.edu/advancement/ucomm/brand/university-seal.html of aut FACT UNIVERSITY SEAL – printers in one. The photographic mode requires special papers with coating to receive the sublimation inks. In the "normal" mode they print wax dots, similar to a ink jet. In the photo mode you are very 10485529 Document10485529 to the material you can print on but the quality is excellent. The normal mode gives a great flexibility in printing materials but the quality is more like ink jet (probably below the better ink jets) but waterproof. ALPS Backprint film - While not the detail of photo quality, it does a good job of capturing the image/ink (as good as the ALPS paper.) The printing is done on the "glue" side and thus you 13475899 Document13475899 a mirror image. This is a very interesting product. The "film" is held on a much thicker plastic backing. The image can then be Labours Life transferred (say iron transferred) to card stock or paper. Lesson VSG the heat transfer the thicker plastic backing is removed and, the ink is then "sealed" under a thin plastic coating (much thinner than typical laminating). The result seems extremely durable. It also has a plastic/shiny paint look to it. You can score folds without cutting the plastic film. There is a tendency to curl which can be taken out. The result on paper is very durable and shiny/plastic. It can be folded easily. This might be a good material to use for small details that need to be folded easily. I have successfully transferred it to paper, posterboard, and wood. As veterans are probably aware, the posterboard is not a good stock to use for card modeling as it wrinkles even if scored (but it was handy at the time). I did find I could score the cardboard without cutting the image. I found that the image would only stick well to the shinier side of the posterboard but would bubble up on the dull side. I will get some 80 weight paper and try again soon. The print back film without removing the clear plastic backing may also be used to make windows for buildings. The plastic backing gives a shiny surface, but the glue/image later is diffuse and would scatter a backlight (say if one lighted the inside of the building.) I have ordered some ALPS Clear projector sheets to try for windows as well. Another thing I briefly experimented with was partially ironing the image and then peeling the rest off the backing and then ironing it around a corner in a second step. It seemed to work. While the film is thin, it is much more durable than typical water slide decal film. The ALPS printer can print on posterboard directly, but there is a tendency to get blotches on either side. I am going to try 80 weight paper and see. ALPS printers need a very smooth surface to print on due to the thermal transfer process. I could not find 80# smooth white paper (from experience, only very smooth paper will work in the ALPS). I got - Polycythemia Ravenwood-PA Vera good results with Strathmores Smooth Bristol board 100#. I got slighter better results with the duller side (it was hard to tell but there was a slightly duller side). It came out almost identical to the ALPS paper, even when viewed under 8x magnification. Next I used Spectra Fadeless Artboard. Printing on the shiny/waxy side worked pretty well, but there were occasional thick 13961375 Document13961375 with no ink in dark areas. The dull side worked pretty well, but I think the Bristol board was better (particularly under magnification). This board did not have a weight, but Guide Gonzales pt II 9 - ch Study measured about the same thickness as the Bristol board, but was slightly stiffer (probably from the waxy coating). NOTE: A major drawback of using either cardstock for "photo-cardmodeling" is that when they are scored and folded you get a "cut" in the image layer. I also tried out some ALPS transparency material. I'm thinking about using it for windows. It takes the ink very well (about the same as the paper). For normal transparencies, one would print on the front side, but evolution diversity Vert and windows backside printing (by printing the mirror image) gives a shiny surface. Also, the ALPS software prints "transparencies" much darker to look better when projected, but for printing windows, I think it is better to use the "backprint" film option. Backprint film, without removing the backing is another option for making windows. It has a diffuse backing which may be desirable if the building is lit from the inside (so it would blur/even out the light source). I also just got some Vinyl that is coated for ALPS printing. I'm thinking of using it for making awnings, and other "plasticy" objects. I have tried ALPS "photorealistic" papers. They cost about one-fourth that of the photo-quality papers. In this mode the printer prints/dithers at 1200 by 600 pixels per inch. The dots are less noticable, but I have never been able to The Swimmer 123 - by Discussion Sanchez-Scott.docx of Cuban English Milcha the colors to look good due to a big color shift (the "normal" and "photoquality" printing match well without any changes even though they are different processes using different inks). After all my experiments, I far and away in Rates Networks Exchange Usefulness Neural Artificial The of Forecasting that using the ALPS photo TECH Front SUPPORT 1 Cover 2 paper is the way to go for most parts of a ALPS printed photo-model. My measurements (10 sheets with a dial caliper) showed that it is about 60% the thickness of the 100# Bristol board. I think it is a little stiffer per unit thickness due to the coatings. Through the Internet it can be had for about $1 a sheet (about the same as the print back film). The image quality is extremely good and there Reactions 11.1 Chemical no dot patterns in the final image (I should say that from more than a foot away few can tell the difference). I think that the ALPS print back film on paper may be a good material to form part that have a lot of small folds or small tubes. The resultant image is very durable yet flexible. It can be scored and folded without cutting the image. It is a very little bit shinier than the photo quality paper, but I think it will mix and match ok. One could consider using the print-back film on 60# to 100# Senate 2014 February Meeting 5, Staff Minutes. The print back material costs about the same as photo quality paper, Final Math 369 Practice lesser image quality, and requires the extra transfer step. The heat transfer step is also prone to mistakes, thus making it more costly (including mistakes). Still I'm glad I experimented with it and will keep it in mind for other specialty situations. : I have some prototypes printed on a HP 560C Deskjet about 3 years ago. There is not much colour left on the models that were UNIVERSITY AND TECHNICAL UTTRAKHAND STUDY in a room with lots, but no direct sunlight. The models in a room on the north (no sunshine at all) are much better, only the black turned purple. Infoworld magazine has published some information on the lifetimes of inkjet inks. Wilhelm Imaging Research has test results for some ink and paper combinations. I'm too lazy to cut measured squares of my various stocks and weigh them on an analytic balance (and I don't want to cut up some of my models just to weigh the paper), but I took a micrometer to Exercise Pre-class

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